At 9/11 memorial, new recognition for a longer-term toll

FILE- In this Jan. 8, 2019 file photo, stone cutters Evan Ladd, left, and Andy Hebert cut a piece of granite at Rock of Ages in Barre, Vt., for use in the 9/11 Memorial Glade in New York. Set in a glade of trees at the Nationals September 11 Memorial & Museum, the granite slabs recognize an initially unseen toll of the 2001 terror attacks: firefighters, police and others who died or fell ill after exposure to toxins unleashed in the wreckage. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke, File)
In this Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, photo a visitor touches one of the granite slabs at the 9/11 Memorial Glade at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York. When the names of nearly 3,000 Sept. 11 victims are read aloud Wednesday, Sept. 11 at the World Trade Center, a half-dozen stacks of stone will quietly salute an untold number of people who aren’t on the list. The granite slabs were installed on the memorial plaza this spring. They recognize an initially unseen toll of the 2001 terrorist attacks: firefighters, police and others who died or fell ill after exposure to toxins unleashed in the wreckage. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
FILE - In this May 30, 2019 file photo, a rose rests next to a photograph of New York City Fire Department Lt. Steven Reisman in the 9/11 Memorial Glade near the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Reisman searched through the World Trade Center debris for remains, and then died in 2014 of brain cancer at age 54. When the names of nearly 3,000 Sept. 11 victims are read aloud Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, at the World Trade Center, a half-dozen stacks of stone will quietly salute an untold number of people who aren’t on the list. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
FILE- In this May 30, 2019 file photo, people gather around stones that are part of the new 9/11 Memorial Glade, on the grounds of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York. On Sept. 11, 2019, when nearly 3,000 9/11 victims' names are read aloud on the memorial plaza, the half-dozen stacks of stone of the 9/11 Memorial Glade will quietly salute an untold number of people who aren't on the list. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
FILE- In this May 30, 2019 file photo, Tina Tilearcio pauses at a stone that is part of the new 9/11 Memorial Glade on the grounds of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, after its dedication ceremony in New York. Her husband, Robert Tilearcio, died in 2017 of illness related to his recovery work at ground zero. When nearly 3,000 Sept. 11 victims' names are read aloud on the memorial plaza on Sept. 11, 2019, a half-dozen stacks of stone will quietly salute an untold number of people who aren’t on the list. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
In this Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, photo a detail of one of the granite slabs and the steel from the original World Trade Center is seen at the 9/11 Memorial Glade at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York. When the names of nearly 3,000 Sept. 11 victims are read aloud Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, at the World Trade Center, a half-dozen stacks of stone will quietly salute an untold number of people who aren’t on the list. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
FILE- In this May 30, 2019 file photo, people gather around stones that are part of a new 9/11 Memorial Glade on the grounds of the National September Memorial and Museum after the Glade's dedication ceremony in New York. Set in a glade of trees during the spring 2019, the granite slabs recognize an initially unseen toll of the 2001 terror attacks: firefighters, police and others who died or fell ill after exposure to toxins unleashed in the wreckage. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

NEW YORK — The Sept. 11 memorial at ground zero has been evolving as the 18th anniversary of the attacks approaches.

This year, when nearly 3,000 victims' names are read aloud there Wednesday, a half-dozen stacks of stone will quietly salute an untold number of people who aren't on that list.

The granite slabs were installed on the memorial plaza this spring . They recognize an initially unseen toll of the 2001 terror attacks: firefighters, police and others who died or fell ill after exposure to toxins unleashed in the wreckage.

Caryn Pfeifer's husband, firefighter Ray Pfeifer, died in 2017 of cancer. It developed after he spent months searching the rubble for remains.

She says the new 9/11 Memorial Glade gives families like hers a place to "think about everybody."

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