Closures on Yellowstone River, waterways continue

A dead whitefish floats belly up near the Mayors Landing Fishing Access in the Yellowstone River in Livingston, Mont. on Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks estimates the fish kill to be in the tens of thousands and issued a closure of all water-based recreation on the Yellowstone from the Yellowstone National Park's northern boundary to Laurel, according to a press release. FWP lab results reveal the catalyst of the kill to be Proliferative Kidney Disease ' one of the most serious diseases to impact whitefish and trout. (/Livingston Enterprise via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

BILLINGS, Mont. — Closures on a 183-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River and hundreds of miles of other waterways could continue for months while biologists try to prevent the spread of a parasite believed to have killed tens of thousands of fish.

The closures will remain until the waterways improve and fish stop dying, according to officials from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The ban includes all fishing, rafting and other river activities.

Officials are now worried the fish kill could have a lasting impact on the Yellowstone's reputation as a world-class trout fishery that draws visitors from around the world.

The closures extend to hundreds of miles of waterways that feed into the Yellowstone, including the Boulder, Shields and Stillwater rivers.

No dead fish were found inside Yellowstone National Park, where a celebration of the National Park Service's 100th anniversary is set for next week and no closures were planned there.

The parasite causes fish to contract a fatal kidney disease and die. FWP spokeswoman Andrea Jones said the disease can have a mortality rate as high as 90 percent. Other places that have had similar outbreaks include Washington state, Oregon, Idaho, Canada and Europe.

Reports of the Yellowstone River fish kill began pouring in more than a week ago. Wildlife officials confirmed more than 4,000 fish deaths, but they say the toll is probably much higher.

Most have been mountain whitefish, a native game species, but reports emerged that the die-off has affected some rainbow trout and Yellowstone cutthroat trout — species crucial to the fishing industry.

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